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Glaucoma

How safe are MIGS devices?

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Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices are routinely used to prevent the need to perform the more invasive trabeculectomy, and although the efficacy of MIGS techniques has been reviewed, safety studies comparing all the available MIGS devices are lacking.

Researchers conducted a literature review on data from 15 devices.

They noted that the CyPass Micro-Stent, which was the first product that attempted to increase outflow to the suprachoroidal space, “was withdrawn from the market due to concerns regarding increased corneal endothelial cell loss at five years post-implantation.”

The remaining devices were all considered well-tolerated and uniformly safe. The review found that most studies reported no statistically significant increase in complications compared with those associated with cataract surgery alone. The most common adverse effects were hyphaema, intraocular pressure spikes, and device migration or obstruction.

The authors noted, however, that the quality of studies included was poor, and many were funded by the device manufacturers.

Reference
Rowson AC, Hogarty DT, Maher D, et al. Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery: Safety of Individual Devices. J Clin Med. 2022;11(22):6833. doi: 10.3390/jcm11226833. PMID: 36431310.

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