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Dry Eye/OSD

Does drinking more water lower risk of dry eye disease?

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In this study, the water intake or 24-hour urine volume of 51 551 participants was used to analyze the relationship with dry eye disease (DED). Water intake was calculated from food frequency questionnaires and DED using the Women’s Health Study (WHS) dry eye questionnaire. Logistic regressions were corrected for age, sex, body mass index, physical activity, smoking status, education, income, 48 comorbidities, and 15 medication groups.

Of the participants, 9.1% had DED, with a higher water intake associated with prevalence of DED (OR: 1.011 per 100 ml/day, 95% CI: 1.004-1.017, P = 0.003). When participants with a clinical diagnosis of DED were excluded, higher water intake was still tied to increased risk of having DED symptoms (OR: 1.010 per 100 ml/day, 95% CI: 1.006-1.015, P < 0.001). There was also an increased risk of DED for those with higher 24-hour urine volumes (OR: 1.010 per 100 ml/day, 95% CI: 1.005-1.015, P < 0.001).

The authors concluded that higher water intake did not appear to reduce the risk of DED but may actually be associated with a modest increased risk.

Reference
Nguyen L, Magno MS, Utheim TP, et al. The relationship between habitual water intake and dry eye disease. Acta Ophthalmol. 2022;doi: 10.1111/aos.15227. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35941821.

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