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Cataract

Study finds potential cognitive benefits of cataract surgery

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Cataract surgery may not only improve vision but also have potential cognitive benefits, including a reduced risk of long-term cognitive decline, according to a study.

The study suggests that cataract surgery could be a modifiable risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia, highlighting the importance of considering the cognitive sequelae of cataracts in patient management.

The study analyzed data from 24 articles involving a total of 558,276 participants. Researchers found that individuals who underwent cataract surgery experienced a 25% reduced risk of long-term cognitive decline compared to those with uncorrected cataracts. This association remained robust across various cognitive outcomes and sensitivity analyses.

Participants who underwent cataract surgery exhibited a similar risk of long-term cognitive decline as healthy controls without cataracts, indicating a potential cognitive benefit of the procedure. In addition, cataract surgery was linked to a 4% improvement in short-term cognitive test scores among participants with normal cognition.

However, the study found no significant association between cataract surgery and cognitive improvement in participants with preexisting cognitive impairment.

Reference
Yeo BSY, Ong RYX, Ganasekar P, et al. Cataract Surgery and Cognitive Benefits in the Older Person: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Ophthalmology. 2024;S0161-6420(24)00102-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2024.02.003. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 38336283.

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