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Ocular Surface Disease

Exploring the dynamics of tear meniscus unveils insights into dry eye conditions

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A comprehensive investigation into the dynamics of tear meniscus parameters has unveiled valuable insights into the realm of dry eye conditions. The study, which utilized an automated and non-invasive approach, discovered significant relationships between dynamic tear meniscus features and dry eye disease.

Key findings include the consistent increase in the average height of the central tear meniscus over time, the ascending pattern of tear meniscus height and area from the nasal to the temporal side, and the identification of upper boundary curvature as a potential indicator for dry eye presence and severity.

The study encompassed data from 38 participants, with tear meniscus videos analyzed within 5 seconds after a complete blink. The analysis involved computing key parameters such as the average height of the tear meniscus at various lengths, the curvature of the upper boundary, and the total area of the tear meniscus in each frame. The effective values of these dynamic parameters were linearly fitted to unveil the changing trends and their correlation with dry eye disease.

In 94.74% of the samples, the average height of the central tear meniscus exhibited a consistent increase over time. Furthermore, 97.37% of the samples showcased an ascending pattern in the overall tear meniscus height (TMH) and area from the nasal to the temporal side. The central TMH experienced a more rapid increase compared to the nasal side, with the temporal side demonstrating the slowest ascent.

Statistical analysis found that the upper boundary curvature of the entire tear meniscus, along with the tear meniscus of the nasal side (at 2, 3, and 4 mm), emerged as valuable indicators for identifying the presence of dry eye and evaluating its severity.

Reference

Zhang YH, Feng J, Yi CY, et al. Dynamic tear meniscus parameters in complete blinking: insights into dry eye assessment. Int J Ophthalmol. 2023;16(12):1911-1918. doi: 10.18240/ijo.2023.12.01. PMID: 38111923; PMCID: PMC10700063.

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