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Pediatrics
Refractive Surgery/Vision Correction

Atropine eye drops ineffective in slowing myopia progression in US children

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Atropine, 0.01%, eye drops are not effective in slowing myopia progression or axial elongation in children in the United States, according to a new study.

This randomized placebo-controlled, double-masked trial involved 187 children from various ethnic backgrounds between the ages of 5 to 12 years with low to moderate myopia. Overall, 125 children received atropine eye drops and 62 children received a placebo. The treatment period lasted for 24 months, followed by a 6-month observation period.

At the primary outcome visit at 24 months, there was no significant difference in the change in SER from baseline between the atropine group and the placebo group. The adjusted mean change in SER from baseline was -0.82 D in the atropine group and -0.80 D in the placebo group, with no statistically significant difference. Similarly, at 30 months (6 months after treatment), there was no significant difference in the change in SER between the groups.

The study also evaluated changes in axial length, which is an indicator of eye growth. No significant difference was observed between the atropine and placebo groups. The adjusted mean changes in axial length from baseline to 24 months were 0.44 mm in the atropine group and 0.45 mm in the placebo group. The adjusted mean change in axial elongation from baseline to 30 months also showed no significant difference between the groups.

Reference
Repka MX, Weise KK, Chandler DL, et al. Low-Dose 0.01% Atropine Eye Drops vs Placebo for Myopia Control: A Randomized Clinical Trial . JAMA Ophthalmol. Published online July 13, 2023. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2023.2855

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