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Dry Eye

Study finds demographic and psychiatric factors impact dry eye disease prevalence in American seniors

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Dry eye disease prevalence among the American geriatric population is influenced by a variety of factors including demographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidities, according to a study that noted significant correlations between gender, race/ethnicity, age, and psychiatric conditions such as depression and anxiety, with the likelihood of experiencing dry eye.

The study analyzed data gathered from a sample of Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older, encompassing over 1.3 million individuals.

It was observed that women exhibited higher odds of experiencing dry eye compared to men. Moreover, Asian and Native American individuals displayed elevated odds of having the condition in comparison to their White counterparts, while Black individuals were found to be less susceptible.

Age also emerged as a significant factor, with seniors aged 75 to 84 years and those aged 85 and above demonstrating higher likelihoods of experiencing dry eye compared to the 65 to 74 age bracket.

The study also highlighted the role of psychiatric comorbidities, particularly depression and anxiety, in exacerbating the prevalence of dry eye. Individuals afflicted with both depression and anxiety exhibited substantially higher odds of experiencing dry eye compared to those with either condition alone.

Reference
Li G, Garzon C, Klawe J, Akpek EK, Ahmad S. Demographic and Psychiatric Associations With Dry Eye in a Medicare Population. Cornea. 2024;doi: 10.1097/ICO.0000000000003516. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 38456830.

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